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Know The Difference Between Spring And Spring Boot

Spring and Spring Boot

by digitalraghul

 

We will learn about Spring and Spring Boot in this essay. The following subjects will be covered in detail: What is Spring, What is Spring Boot, how Spring and Spring Boot differ from one another, how Spring Boot compares to Spring MVC, and many other frequently asked questions regarding Spring and Spring Boot. You will have a solid understanding of the foundations of Spring and Spring Boot at the end of this article.

 

What is Spring?

Before learning about Spring, let’s first define a framework. The framework is a flexible design environment for software systems that support code libraries and a number of scripting languages. A framework is something that makes core programming simple, to put it simply. There are frameworks for many different languages, including PHP, Perl, Java, Python, and Ruby. All software frameworks are created with the idea of reuse of the code and offering resources to aid developers in creating and connecting various parts of a software project.

Since we now understand what a framework is, let’s move on to the description of Spring. Describe spring. Since Spring supports a number of frameworks, including Struts, JSP, Hibernate, and others, we might compare it to the framework of frameworks. Spring is a lightweight application framework. Rod Johnson created the initial version of the Spring framework in 2002, and it was first made available in 2003 under the Apache license version 2.0.

 

What is Spring Boot?

Making standalone, professional Spring-based Applications is simple using Spring Boot. It is a Java-based framework for developing microservices, which are characterized as small services that cooperate. An approach to architecture known as a “microservice” separates an application into a number of loosely connected services that carry out business requirements.

Let’s now comprehend the definition of Spring Boot in layman’s terms. Word “spring boot” is composed of two words. Seasonal and Boot The phrases spring and boot are combined because the first component of spring stands for the spring framework (the framework that enables you to create enterprise Java applications). Something that enables you to bootstrap a Spring application from scratch is referred to as spring boot.

Mike Youngstrom, a client, asked for the spring framework to be bootstrapped in order to be released right away in an October 2012 Jira ticket (Jira is a program used for problem tracking and project management). Spring Boot was created as a result at the beginning of 2013.

 

Key Differences

Now that we are fully aware of what Spring and Spring Boot are, let’s quickly go through their primary distinctions.

Since Spring supports a variety of frameworks, including Struts, JSP, Hibernate, and others, we may compare it to the framework of frameworks and use it to construct applications, but Spring Boot is a spring-based framework that is mostly used to create REST APIs.

With the aid of the Spring Boot Framework, developers may cut down on development time and effort while also increasing productivity. The main distinction between Spring and Spring Boot is dependency injection, while Spring’s core feature is autoconfiguration.

 

What Separates Spring from Spring Boot

 

Spring

 

Where it’s used?

A Java EE framework called Spring is used to create applications.

Key feature

Dependency injection, a design method that removes dependencies from computer code to make the program easier to maintain and test, is the core or most significant component of the Spring framework.

Why it’s used

Its objective is to simplify Java EE (Enterprise Edition) development so that developers may work more efficiently.

Type of Application Development

A loosely linked application can be built using the Spring framework.

Servers dependency

We must explicitly configure the servers in the Spring framework in order to test the Spring Project.

Deployment descriptor

A deployment descriptor is necessary in order to execute a Spring application.

In-memory database support

The in-memory database is not supported by the Spring framework.

Boilerplate code

Even for simple tasks, the Spring framework requires too many lines of boilerplate code.

Configurations

The Spring framework requires manual configuration building.

Dependencies

To build a web app with Spring Framework, certain dependencies are needed.

HTTP Authentication

In order to enable security confirmations, HTTP Basic Authentication specifies that a number of requirements and configurations must be enabled. To configure security in an application, Spring needs both the spring-security-web and spring-security-config requirements. Next, we must include a class that uses the @EnableWebSecurity annotation and extends the WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter.

Testing

Due to the substantial amount of source code, testing Spring Boot is more challenging than testing Spring Boot.

XML Configuration

The Spring framework needs XML Configuration.

CLI Tools

There is no CLI tool offered by the Spring framework for creating and testing apps.

Plugins

In contrast to Spring Boot, the Spring framework does not offer any plugins for Maven, Gradle, etc.

 

Spring Boot

 

Where it’s used?

REST API development is the major use of the Spring Boot framework.

Key feature

Autoconfiguration is the primary feature of Spring Boot. The process of automatically configuring a Spring application based on dependencies identified on the classpath is known as “Spring Boot autoconfiguration.” Through the elimination of the requirement to define some beans that are a part of the auto-configuration classes, auto-configuration can speed up and simplify development.

Why it’s used

For quicker application development, Spring Boot adds the RAD (Rapid Application Development) functionality to the Spring framework.

Type of Application Development

A stand-alone application can be made with the aid of Spring Boot.

Servers dependency

Tomcat and Jetty are just two of the built-in or embedded servers that Spring Boot offers.

Deployment descriptor

There is no requirement for the Deployment descriptor in Spring Boot.

In-memory database support

H2 is one of the in-memory databases that Spring Boot supports.

Boilerplate code

You don’t use boilerplate code, which saves time and boosts output.

Configurations

There are default settings in Spring Boot that enable quicker bootstrapping.

Dependencies

On the other side, Spring Boot only requires one dependency to make an application functional. Additional dependencies that are needed during build time are added by default to the final archive.

HTTP Authentication

These dependencies are also necessary for Spring Boot to function, but we only need to specify the requirement of spring-boot-starter-security because this will automatically add all the necessary dependencies to the classpath.

Testing

Spring Boot testing is simpler because there is less source code to maintain.

XML Configuration

In Spring Boot, no XML configuration is required.

CLI Tools

For creating and testing Spring Boot apps, Spring Boot offers a CLI tool.

Plugins

Maven and Gradle build tool plugins are offered by Spring Boot. The packaging of executable jars is one of the functionalities provided by the Plugins.

 

Conclusion

Though they are closely related, we now have a solid idea of what Spring and SpringBoot are. In conclusion, Spring Boot offers all of the features of the standard Spring framework while also significantly simplifying application development. Because all Spring Boot properties are pre-configured, you can get an application up and running much faster than with Spring.

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